ICUPPH Members

Dolores Acevedo-García
Dolores Acevedo-Garcia has a doctoral degree in public policy and demography. She is currently an associate professor at Northeastern University in the Bouve College of Health Sciences, where she is also the associate director of the Institute on Urban Health Research. She has been part of the faculty at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) since 1998. Her research interests include the effect of social determinants (e.g. residential segregation, immigrant integration) on health disparities, especially along racial and ethnic lines, and the role of non-health policies (e.g. housing policies, immigrant policies) in reducing those disparities.

Mariana Arcaya
Mariana Arcaya received her Master of City Planning degree from the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She was a student in the department's Housing, Community, and Economic Development program group interested in environmental health justice issues. Mariana holds a bachelor's degree in Environmental Science and Policy from Duke University. Before beginning graduate school, Mariana worked at Duke University's Children's Environmental Health Initiative helping to develop a household-level priority model for childhood lead exposure. Later, she worked as an environmental consultant preparing environmental impact statements for large transportation infrastructure projects. Currently, Mariana is a doctoral student in the Department of Society, Human Development and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health.

Marlene Camacho
Marlene Camacho is a doctoral student in the Department of Society, Human Development and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. As a Biology and Society major at Cornell University, Marlene developed an interest in the effects of neighborhoods on child development. She also holds a Master of Public Health degree in Health Policy and Management from Tufts University and a Master of Science degree from the Harvard School of Public Health. Within the doctoral program, she is interested in the development of evidence-based policy and the role of public policies, particularly housing and early childhood education, in reducing health disparities among children in metropolitan areas.

Lindsey Cox
Lindsey Cox is a Master of Science candidate in the Department of Society, Human Development and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. She is interested in the intersection between the built environment and health, and currently works for the Harvard Prevention Research Center analyzing the impacts of federal transportation funding on walking and bicycling levels. Prior to graduate school, she worked in Sacramento as a Project Coordinator for the California Center for Physical Activity, a program of the California Department Public Health. She coordinated the Center's Walkable Community Workshops and Home Zones projects to promote safe and active lifestyles through community design. She graduated from Stanford in 2003 with a degree in Urban Studies and minor in Human Biology.

Dustin Duncan
Dustin Duncan is a doctoral student in the Department of Society, Human Development, and Health at HSPH. He completed his undergraduate studies at Morehouse College and earned a master’s degree from HSPH. Dustin’s research aims to: 1) design and evaluate community-based health behavior change interventions, and 2) elucidate social determinants of health behaviors; particularly, his work involves the intersection between urban neighborhood environments, physical activity, and obesity among racial/ethnic minority children and adults. Dustin has conducted research and evaluation work in a variety of settings. Presently, he is working with the Harvard Prevention Research Center on Nutrition and Physical Activity.

Suzanne Hague
Suzanne Hague is a degree candidate for the Master in Urban Planning (2008) at the Harvard University Graduate School of Design. She studied architecture at the Southern California Institute of Architecture in Los Angeles, and worked in the office of Koning Eizenberg Architecture in Santa Monica, CA. Previous to this career in the physical environment, Suzanne studied and worked in the social sciences, earning Bachelor's degrees in Psychology and Anthropology (University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, 1999) and working as a social worker in mental health at the innovative Village Integrated Service Agency in Long Beach, CA. She grew up in Pittsburgh, and plans to continue her career in physical planning with an emphasis on community and economic development.

Peter James
Peter James is a doctoral student in the Departments of Environmental Health and Epidemiology at the Harvard School of Public Health. His research focuses on the impact of the built environment on health, spanning from issues of building materials and components of building design, to aspects of transportation and planning. Peter earned his bachelor’s degree at the University of Pennsylvania in Earth and Environmental Sciences and the History and Sociology of Science. He holds a Master of Health Sciences degree in Environmental Health Sciences from the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, where he wrote his thesis on the Health Impacts of Urban Form. He has worked as an environmental consultant preparing environmental impact assessments and has conducted literature reviews on health issues for the Institute of Medicine. His most recent research concerns measuring health symptoms and factors of indoor environmental quality in green buildings compared to conventional buildings on Harvard’s campus. His dissertation will focus on the role of urban form in impacting both physical activity and exposure to air pollution.

Jill Krechowicz
Jill Krechowicz is a Master of Science student in the Department of Society, Human Development and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. She developed an interest in how research knowledge is translated into health and social policy while studying in the Bachelor's of Health Science programme at McMaster University in Hamilton, On. Her research interests include the social determinants of health and especially how neighborhood level characteristics influence population health.

Megan Lee
Megan Lee is a Master of Science student in the Department of Society, Human Development and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. While an undergraduate at the University of New Hampshire, she earned a Bachelor's degree in Nutrition Science. Her interests include food security and food policy, as well as using water and sanitation systems as a public health intervention in developing countries. She is also interested in how research influences food policies and how non-health policies influence health outcomes.

Lindsey Morse
Lindsey Morse is a Master in Urban Planning student at the Harvard Graduate School of Design. Her background is in the social sciences with a concentration in health policy and public health. She is very interested in the intersection of planning (in particular the built environment) and public health, in particular around transportation and infrastructure in terms of sustainable growth, non-auto transportation, pollution, and access to services.

Nicolas Oreskovic
Nicolas Oreskovic is currently earning his Master of Public Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. He is a physician currently pursuing a research fellowship at Massachusetts General Hospital. His research focuses on how the built environment affects health. His current research projects include a study linking clinical and GIS databases to assess how the built environment affects obesity among Massachusetts children. He has recently received a one year grant from the Deborah Munroe Noonan Memorial Fund to assess for potential barriers to active commuting to school among children with asthma.

Lindsay Rosenfeld
Lindsay Rosenfeld holds a master of science and a doctor of science from the Department of Society, Human Development and Health at the Harvard School of Public Health. While an undergraduate at Brown University, she earned a degree in women's studies, focusing in ethnic studies and sociology. Her doctoral work concentrated on Health and Social Policy, focusing on traditionally "non-health" policies that impact health. She is currently an adjunct faculty member and research scientist at Northeastern University at the Institute on Urban Health Research. She is particularly interested in policies within the areas of urban planning and design, neighborhoods, housing, education, (im)migration, and health literacy. She has worked broadly in public health research, program design, nonprofits, and as an educator.

Laurie Tamis
Laurie Tamis is a Master of City Planning candidate in the Department of Urban Studies and Planning at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She is in the department's Housing, Community, and Economic Development program group and is interested in commercial revitalization as well as urban food policy and planning, including issues of quality, access, and health impacts. Prior to graduate school, she worked for the City of New York, first for the Deputy Mayor of Economic Development, focusing on the redevelopment of Lower Manhattan, and then for the city's affordable housing agency. She was a Coro Fellow in New York City and graduated from Cornell University with a Bachelor of Arts in Government.

Lawrence Tsang
Lawrence Tsang is a Masters degree candidate in Environmental Management at the Harvard Extension School. He holds a Bachelor of Science in Biology at Concordia University in Montreal, Quebec. His current research focuses on the promotion of environmental technologies in the development of industrial facilities in the Pearl River Delta of China through technology diffusion and policy formulation. He is also looking into how programs such as ENERGY STAR can be implemented in China. He is interested in green design, policy framework and urban development in terms of sustainable growth.

Reginald Tucker-Seeley
Reginald Tucker-Seeley holds a master of science and doctor of science in health and social policy from the Harvard School of Public Health. He is currently a postdoc with the Center for Community Based Research at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. His research interests are related to understanding the political economy of place and health in urban contexts through the lens of complex adaptive systems theory. His dissertation work focused on the individual, neighborhood, and city-level factors that influence physical activity. Reginald is interested in exploring his research interests through the development of theoretical and empirical models using agent-based modeling methods and hierarchical/multilevel methods.

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